August 29, 2017

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The Balayage Buzz

August 29, 2017

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The Balayage Buzz

August 29, 2017

 

Are you hearing the word, BALAYAGE, from friends, stylists or television and seeing the word pop up just about everywhere on social media and in magazines? Are you wondering what it is and what the buzz is all about? 

 

To keep y'all in the loop, I will answer some frequently asked questions about this most desired hair color service. 

 

What is a balayage and how do I pronounce it? 

 

First off, it's pronounced Ball - Lay - Azh (age like in collage). It means sweeping or painting the hair in French. This technique has been around since the 1970s and developed in France. It definitely isn’t new, but it has evolved into one of the biggest hair color trends in the past decade. This sought-after technique involves free-hand painting hair color or lightener onto the hair rather than weaving out pieces with a comb and putting it into foils. 

 

Why do people prefer a balayage over a traditional foil highlight?

I love doing both, but the outcome of a balayage is different. The results of a balayage are more of a natural, less symmetrical, sun-kissed effect. Many love that a balayage is low-maintenance since it grows out very naturally unlike the uniformed weaved lines you would see with a traditional foil highlight. When a balayage is done right, the highlights look perfectly blended and seamless. 

 

Will my greys be covered? 

YES! Grey hair can either be blended with the highlights or completely covered with haircolor as usual before painting the hair.

 

Will it look like I have grown out roots?

No, not exactly. Here is the root of the confusion: people often mistake a Balayage with an Ombré. Ombré is another hair coloring trend where the roots appear darker than the rest of the hair. So, if you want this look, a balayage can create this effect ... but that is up to you.

 

Ok, so what is the difference between a BALAYAGE and an OMBRÉ then?

An Ombré is the look you see where the root area is darker and gradually becomes lighter on the ends. Some are more dramatic and high contrast than others, but should always be seamless in blending. To achieve an Ombré style, you can use a BALAYAGE technique or a foil technique.

 

To make it easier to understand, I would say BALAYAGE is a technique and OMBRÉ is more of a style or an effect that is achieved.

 

Can I have a partial balayage?

YES! That’s what’s awesome about a balayage, it’s completely tailored to you. I can put a few balayaged pieces in the front or paint heavily for more of an all-over lighter effect. It’s bespoke beauty!

 

Will I be able to add some lowlights when doing a balayage?

YES! If you feel you need more dimension or want to look “root-ier”, lowlights can be applied along with a balayage.

 

Will my hair lighten enough?

Yes, for most people. Unless you are considering a drastic color transformation, like from black to light blonde, a balayage can lighten hair enough with time and/or heat. Remember, a balayage is typically a more organic looking highlight. It would either take another session or putting hair in foil to achieve a more drastic or lighter effect.

 

Lastly…

 

Should I get a balayage?

Absolutely! It’s a low-maintenance color that can be done on any hair color in any season. It is modern, grows out wonderfully and is flattering on pretty much everyone. It’s a trend that is not going away anytime soon. 

 

 

Check out the video below on a heavy balayage I did on a client. She went from a dirty blonde to a bright and beautiful, Pale Blonde BOMBSHELL!

VIDEO CREDIT: Patricia Gonion

MUSIC CREDIT: Dreams by Joakim Karud https://soundcloud.com/joakimkarud

Creative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported— CC BY-SA 3.0 

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...

Music provided by Audio Library https://youtu.be/VF9_dCo6JT4

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